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Keyflow Stage1v3

Changing places: Sally Randell takes over Broad Hinton training yard from Andy Turnell

 

Sally Randell and KillimordalySally Randell and KillimordalySally Randell has just applied for her training licence.  For the past year she has been assistant trainer at Andy Turnell's yard on the edge of Broad Hinton - soon she will be taking over the yard.  

Turnell, who as a youngster was a star jockey and then became the quiet man of racehorse training, is still recovering from the stroke he had two years ago which paralysed much of his right side.  He will be changing to a 'supporting role' at the stables.

He and his wife hit it off with Sally from the word go.  He told the Racing Post: "I'm confident this will work.  Apart from being a tireless worker, Sally is bringing new owners to the yard."

Turnell 'inherited' his licence from his father who trained at Ogbourne Maizey.  But Turnell, who is now 66, moved his training establishment around England, before settling back to Wiltshire and his everyday view of the Hackpen white horse.

Sally had been training point-to-pointers in Wales and when she arrived at the Turnell yard just a year ago, it was empty.  While Andy was recovering from his stroke, the horses had gone to other other trainers.  Working together closely , Andy, his wife Gilly and Sally have re-built the yard and have been having successes - six winners in the 2014-2015 jump season.

There are now seven horses training in the licensed yard for the summer.  In the winter Sally hopes to get that up to sixteen or seventeen.

Sally has completed her three modules at Newmarket's British Racing School.  Also on her courses was another soon-to-be trainer from just the other side of Marlborough, champion jockey Richard Hughes.

On the all-weather circuit On the all-weather circuit When Marlborough News Online was at the stables, Sally and amateur jockey Brodie Hampson were riding out the final two horses of the morning.  Brodie was on the eight year-old Waddingtown Hero who has had two recent wins in chases at Ffos Las.

"Ffos Las has been good for us," says Sally with a smile.  But looking closer at the results tables you find that Waddingtown Hero has come third-first-second-second-first in his last five races - providing quite a tonic for the yard.

Sally was riding the bay gelding Killimordaly - a six year-old named after a village near Galway.  His Irish owner, Patsy Hardiman, died recently - very suddenly.   

Sally Randell, Donnas Palm, Brodie Hampson Sally Randell, Donnas Palm, Brodie Hampson His  family are keeping Hardiman's other horse, the four year-old Any Destination.  But Sally is now forming a syndicate to keep Killimordaly at the yard.  He raced over hurdles last season and early in June he came second in a two mile seven furlong chase at Ffos Las.

Brodie, in the earliest of her twenties, has known Sally since she was eleven.  Her father was Sally's detachment commander when they were serving with the Royal Artillery.  And she met Brodie who kept a pony at the regimental Saddle Club when Sally was there.  

They have worked together for five years and Sally believes Brodie has a great future as a jockey.  She won her first ever point-to-point race and with six wins over jumps and under rules she came second in the 2014-2015 Amateur Lady Jockeys National Hunt Championship - behind Bridget Andrews.

Sally told us that one of best memories of her year at the stables was seeing the delight on Andy Turnell's face when Brodie rode Aristocracy to a three lengths victory in a hurdle race at Wincanton last November: "He thinks the world of Brodie."

Sally herself was no mean jockey and only announced her retirement earlier this year.  In 2009, riding Oakfield Legend, she became the first woman to win Sandown's Grand Military Gold Cup.  She won it again in 2014 on Bradley and again this year on Loose Chips.   

Another boost to her year has been seeing how Andy made great progress in his recovery once the horses were back in the yard: "He's back to his old self."  

He travels to the races with Sally, but gets pretty tired.  Every week he goes to Oaksey House, the Injured Jockeys Fund headquarters in Lambourn, for physiotherapy - and he rides with the Lambourn Riding for the Disabled.

Sally says the Turnell training establishment is "A really great yard" and she is very pleased to be taking it over.  It has 17 licensed boxes, enough paddocks for the horses to be turned out every day, an under-cover horse walker ("Great for the winter!") and a long all-weather circuit.  Further down, the barn has sixteen more horses that Sally plans to keep for point-to-pointers.

Brodie Hampson & Donnas Palm at the Cambridge Harriers Point-to-Point, Cottenham December 2014 (Photo copyright Racehorse Photos) Brodie Hampson & Donnas Palm at the Cambridge Harriers Point-to-Point, Cottenham December 2014 (Photo copyright Racehorse Photos) On the day we visited Sally, yard manager Gerald Burton and his son Sam were away on training courses.  Sam is just turning sixteen and joins as a novice aiming to be an amateur jockey.

Sally has just appointed Emma Owen to look after the yard's admin and publicity, and she too has been at the Racing School.  And Kate Leahy is joining the team soon.

And then we are introduced to Donnas Palm - an eleven year-old grey gelding with a history and now quite a magisterial presence at the yard.  

Beginning in 2008, Donnas Palm raced in Ireland and chalked up six wins and three seconds in his first 13 outings.  Ridden by such well-known jockeys as Paul Carberry and Barry Geraghty, he won eleven races under rules.   Racing in England from April 2013 onwards was not such a success.

He is now trained by Sally for point-to-pointing.  In that first race in Ireland at Navan he was ridden by Nina Carberry, so it is fitting that Brodie Hampson has been racing him recently.

Brodie says he is an 'absolutely straightforward horse'.  There is, however, a 'but'.  If he finds himself in the 'wrong position' with other horses in a race "He simply tries his best to stop."  Brodie now has the measure of him and Sally hopes he will be at the yard for the rest of his days.

Thanks to Racehorse Photos for use of their photo of Brodie Hampson and Donnas Palm.

[Click on photos to enlarge them.]

 

 

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Switching saddles: Newbury racecourse welcomes Victoria Pendleton's first public outing as a jockey

 

Riding down to the start (photo by kind permission of Betfair)Riding down to the start (photo by kind permission of Betfair)Victoria Pendleton - the 'golden girl' of British cycling - started riding just nineteen weeks ago and at Newbury Racecourse on Thursday evening (July 2) she took part in a charity race - her first outing in public.  The flat race, The George Frewer Celebration Sweepstake over one mile and five furlongs, was the first on the evening card raising funds for the Key4Life charity.  

She said afterwards that she was thrilled with her first ride in a race.  She finished eighth in a field of eleven on the eight year-old bay gelding Mighty Mambo - trained by Lawney Hill at her Oxfordshire yard and for whom Victoria is now riding out.  

As one seasoned racing correspondent put it: "Few novice riders would even begin to contemplate anything like a public race and fewer still would have sustained such enthusiasm in the face of the inevitable tumbles and petty humiliations that horses deliver." (Chris Cook, The Guardian.)

The walk from the weighing room: Victoria and Charlotte PlunkettThe walk from the weighing room: Victoria and Charlotte PlunkettPendleton and Mighty Mambo got away rather slowly from the start.  But she made some late progress: "I gave him too much to do. There's a really long straight here and I thought some horses would blow out so I wanted to bide my time.  It was over too quickly.  I wish I could do it again."

 The charity race was won by Oratorio's Joy trained by Mr J.A.Osborne and ridden by Maisie Turner, with Charlotte Plunkett (Barbury trainer Alan King's PA) second on Uriah Heap - trained by her boss.

Safely on board - watched by Alan King (at right) Safely on board - watched by Alan King (at right) The age range of the riders taking part in the charity race was staggering.  The youngest was Jacob Jelfs (aged 20) - he rides out for trainer Charlie Hills.  And the oldest was Sir Mark Todd (aged 59) New Zealand eventing star based just over the Marlborough Downs at Badgerstown.  He almost certainly has more Olympic medals than Ms Pendleton.

The challenge to Victoria Pendleton from Betfair proved to be one she could not refuse. It was not just a challenge to switch from bicycle to horse, but to become a race jockey.  

Once she had retired from competitive cycling after the London Olympics, she had been looking for a challenge - perhaps a challenge a little more atuned to her skills and love of speed than Strictly Come Dancing.  Betfair provide it: they wanted to find "an unexpected and entertaining perspective on horse racing, while also profiling the skills, athleticism and courage faced by jockeys every day."  

Training is hard work:  riding out (Betfair photo) Training is hard work: riding out (Betfair photo) Victoria & AP McCoyVictoria & AP McCoyBetfair assembled a team of experts to make sure Victoria could reach their ambitious target.  The team included chef d'equipe of the British eventing team, Yogi Breisner, trainer Lawney Hill, para-dressage rider Tamsin Addison, champion trainer and Betfair ambassador Paul Nichols.  Oh, and she had some words of wisdom from another retired champion - AP McCoy.

At 34-years-old, Victoria had been riding bicycles since she was three-years-old and had only had the occasional holiday pony ride.  Her record made her Britain's most successful woman Olympic athlete, so she certainly knows about the hard work and dedication the change of saddles would involve.  

[To enlarge click on image][To enlarge click on image]The Betfair challenge aims to get Victoria ready to take part in the Foxhunters Amateur Chase at the 2016 Cheltenham Festival.  On the way she will have more charity races before she goes to the British Racing School to see whether she qualifies for an amateur's licence. And before the end of 2015 she hopes to be able to have some point-to-point rides.

Betfair's Mark Ody, is more than hopeful she will make the Cheltenham race:  "With Victoria's Olympic pedigree, our support network, a lot of hard work, we're all hugely confident that we'll be cheering Victoria on in the Foxhunters Amateur at Cheltenham Festival 2016."


The George Frewer Charity Race at Newbury (sponsored by the Bernard Sunley Charitable Foundation) was in memory of George Frewer, who died in a freak accident on what would have been his 17th birthday.  His passion was horse racing. To date over of £450,000 has been raised in his memory.

 

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Kauto Star put down after a fall in the paddock

Kauto Star and Laura Collett in July 2013Kauto Star and Laura Collett in July 2013Kauto Star - the gelding who won races and racegoers' hearts - has been put down after falling in the paddock and suffering severe neck and pelvis injuries.

The British eventer Laura Collett announced his death on Twitter.

The 15-year-old had been retired from racing in 2012 and Laura Collett had successfully retrained him in dressage.  

Kauto Star and Laura gave a dressage display at the Barbury Horse Trials last year.  And in March they appeared together in publicity for Channel 4's Cheltenham Festival coverage - along with Denman, Big Bucks and Masterminded.

Kauto Star won the Cheltenham Gold Cup twice.  He won 23 of his 41 races, including five King George VI Steeplechases.

Kauto Star's owner, Clive Smith told BBC Radio 5 live: "It is really devastating - he was looking fit and well at Laura Collett's yard. The main injury was to the neck, as it gets worse it attacks the spinal cord. He also fractured his pelvic bone. A really sad time indeed."

"He had a great talent for never giving up. He wanted to win. With jockey Ruby Walsh riding him, he put this massive effort in at the end of races. He had a heart of a lion."

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Local champion jockey Richard Hughes will start his training career sooner than expected

Richard Hughes and the championship trophyRichard Hughes and the championship trophyRichard Hughes will be moving away from his Marlborough home (well, Collingbourne Ducis really) sooner than planned - he wants to get started as a trainer this autumn.  Yet he still wants to be champion jockey - for the fourth year running.

In his Racing Post column (Friday, June 26), Hughes revealed he had completed his formal training to become a trainer, his yard just over the border at Danebury in Hampshire was ready and he was looking forward to buying his first horses at the July sales: "I cannot allow my training career to be jeopardised by my championship ambitions."

Hughes is currently on 37 winners for this flat race season.  That puts him level with  Silvestre de Sousa.  But Ryan Moore is ahead with 47 victories.

Following his Racing Post column, Richard Hughes is no longer odds on to win the championship.  He is now a 5-1 chance.

"The truth is, I absolutely cannot wait to train.  I had thought I would aim to kick off next year, but my thinking has changed and my ambition is to saddle my first runners in September or October."  He stresses he is still a committed jockey - and wants to win the championship: "...I'll continue to give 100 per cent to every horse I ride."

Hughes will be training on the site of Stockbridge racecourse.  This has a long and formidable history - but it is pretty ancient history.

The racecourse closed in 1898.  You can still see a small reminder of the abandoned Victorian stand which burnt down some decades ago.  Racehorses have been trained at Danebury for many years - its stables boast a Derby and a Grand National winner.  Though the Derby winner was Andover in 1836 and the Grand National winner was Playfair in 1888.

Hughes will be taking over Ken Cunningham-Brown's Danebury yard: "Ken would love nothing more than for Danebury to get back on the map and to one day rival Manton - and it could, because it really is that good."

It has 300 acres of grass gallops, a one-mile peat gallop, a one-mile woodchip, a round half-mile sand gallop and a five-furlong straight gallop going through the woods.

Richard Hughes already has promises from several owners that they will send horses to him.  He rounded off his column: "I hope you can tell how eager and excited I am.  I love being a jockey, but I know I will love being a trainer every bit as much."

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Andrew Nicholson's Avebury - a three time victor at Barbury - is honoured with a video tribute

 

Avebury at the Avebury fence - from the videoAvebury at the Avebury fence - from the videoThere are thirteen chalk white horses of Wiltshire.  You can top off that unlucky number by adding eventing's Wiltshire wonder horse: Avebury - a grey who now matches the chalk horses for whiteness.  

The organisers of the St James's Place Wealth Management Barbury International Horse Trials (July 9-12) are marking Avebury's outstanding successes with a video about him - which you can watch here.  This video explains what makes him such a special horse.  
 
In addition, the horse trials, which take place on the Barbury Castle Estate on Marlborough Downs, are renaming their signature fence on the cross country course after Avebury.  
 
Avebury is ridden by Andrew Nicholson, whose stables are at Lockeridge, and owned by Rosemary Barlow.  Last year Avebury and Andrew achieved a historic hat trick - winning the prestigious Barbury International three star competition for a third consecutive year.
 
Avebury was bred by Andrew, raised in Wiltshire and named after the Avebury World Heritage Site - just a few miles from Barbury.  And Avebury is a regular visitor to the Barbury Estate where he works on its famous gallops.
 
Andrew Nicholson explains that Avebury is a straightforward horse who likes the crowds: "Avebury loves Barbury and he also loves the camera so filming this video was good fun. We are all proud of what he has achieved here and look forward to being back at Barbury in a few weeks time.”
 
Nigel Bunter, Chairman of Barbury International Horse Trials, sees the renaming of their most iconic cross-country fence as a fitting tribute to a wonderful horses: "We hope Avebury fans will enjoy our film on him. We want to encourage as many as possible to visit Barbury in July to see a living legend and maybe history repeating itself with a four timer!"

Another frame from the videoAnother frame from the video
 
Tickets for the Barbury Horse Trials start from £12 per person per day booked in advance.  Children under 12 years go free.   For information and tickets visit the Barbury website or call 01672 516125

 

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Marlborough: centre of a big equestrian industry and home to Keyflow Feeds

The jump down to the water in the main arena is probably the most watched obstacle on Barbury International Horse Trials' famous cross country course - it's in prime position for spectators and it is sponsored by Keyflow Super Premium Horse Feeds.

Appropriately enough, Keyflow's range of equine feeds was launched at the Barbury Horse Trials in 2012.  They’ve been there every year since and will again occupy their stand this year in prime position with great views of the competition and a cold Pimms never far away – everyone is welcomed.  

The company is run by New Zealander Cam Price who lives in Marlborough - and the company has its head office just behind the High Street.

Cam has worked in the equine nutrition business for over ten years.  He headed up Australian feed giant Mitavite's operation first in New Zealand and then in Britain.  With the recession and unhelpful currency movements, Mitavite decided to close its European export arm - and Cam spotted an opportunity to launch a innovative new range of products designed to give riders what their horses need in the best way possible.

New Zealand's most successful event rider, Sir Mark Todd (now based just over the downs at Badgerstown) is a Keyflow founder, shareholder and remains as an involved director.  Cam told Marlborough News Online: "He is a very switched on businessman - as well as a great horseman."

Sir Mark Todd at LuhmuhlenSir Mark Todd at Luhmuhlen"We went to the riders first and analysed what their horses nutritional needs were."  He went to the Whitaker show-jumping family and designed a mix specifically for them: "And then we did the same for Mark. We started with the riders and horses rather than in the lab - then we met in the middle."

The 'lab element' came with Keyflow's two renowned nutritional consultants:  Dr Catherine Dunnett founded Newmarket-based Independent Equine Nutrition - an international consultancy.  And Australian Dr Ray Biffin who was responsible for Mitavite's very first proprietary feed in 1987.

In 2013 two Keyflow products earned British Equine Trade Association Innovation Awards - Whitaker Bros Jumpmix won and Mark Todd Maestro competition mix was runner up.

As well as the elite British show-jumping Whitaker brothers (John and Michael - and now young Jack Whitaker who is the latest show-jumping prodigy in the dynasty) and Sir Mark Todd, Keyflow have a list of Key Riders.  These include Cam's brother Tim and Tim's wife Jonelle and Canadian Rebecca Howard - all based at Mildenhall.

Keryflow at Marlborough marketKeryflow at Marlborough marketAt present Jonelle is fifth in the international eventing rankings - and Tim is ninth.

Probably only people in Marlborough with a definite interest in Keyflow products will have noticed this business in their midst.  But for six weeks last winter Cam took a pitch in the High Street's Saturday market - just to get the name a bit better known.  However, his main aim is to keep in touch with Keyflow users.

"I love building horses with the right nutrition for what they do.  If you're selling ploughs you meet a famer once in ten years.  With horse feed it's an everyday relationship - they open your bags of feed every day,"

So he does a lot of travelling to stables to help people with their horses' nutritional needs - usually spending two days a week on the road.

Keyflow’s feeds are put together by a production partner in East Anglia using ingredients sourced in Britain and some specialist ingredients from abroad. The feeds are then distributed from a warehouse in Corby.  

One of Cam's current tasks is building up a nationwide network of stockists: "It's a very competitive market - it's not so much the number of companies, more the vast number of products most of them produce - the market gets a bit swamped.  It's a very squeezey market - many retailers are short of space."

Watch this space for an announcement soon in the development of that network of stockists.

At the Barbury International Horse Trials (9-12 July), while Cam and his team will be spreading the word about Keyflow, they will also be keeping an eye on their Key Riders. Success in competition helps boost Keyflow's reputation but also proves that their products perform.  

Jonelle and Cloud Dancer Jonelle and Cloud Dancer Last weekend they were watching the leader boards at Luhmuhlen's four and three star eventing competitions.  The Luhmuhlen premier or four star competition was won last year by Tim Price.   

On Sunday (June 21) Jonelle Price and the little grey Faerie Dianimo secured second place with 32.80 points just behind Ingrid Klimke's 32.70.  Jonelle was very pleased with the result: "Give us another six to 12 months and I might be able to find that point one."

In all three Keyflow Riders were in the top ten with Mark Todd (fifth) and Rebecca Howard (tenth.)  And then Jonelle took Cloud Dancer to fifth place in the three star competition - coming down the leaderboard a little as rails went down in the show jumping.

What successes will Barbury bring for Marlborough-based eventing riders - and for Keyflow?

Click on images to enlarge them

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Beckhampton trainer Roger Charlton cheered by Time Test win at Royal Ascot

In the colours of owner Khalid Abdullah, with Frankie Dettori in sparkling form and the ground right, Time Test trained at Beckhampton by Roger Charlton ran away with the Group Three Tercentenary Stakes on Royal Ascot's Gold Cup day.

The race turned into a battle between Marlborough trainers.

Sent off as favourite for the race, Dettori took Time Test from midfield to beat the Queen's horse Peacock by three and a quarter lengths.    Peacock is trained by Marlborough trainer Richard Hannon and was ridden by local jockey Richard Hughes.

After the race Dettori said the three-tear-old Time Test felt like a Group One horse.

In the run-up to Royal Ascot, Roger Charlton had the disappointment of finding one of his star horses Al Kazeem had suffered an injury and could not run in this week's Prince of Wales's Stakes.  The seven-year-old suffered an injury when winning the prestigious Tattersalls Gold Cup at the Curragh last month - by a neck.

Al Kazeem was retired to stud at the end of the 2013 season, but proved sub-fertile and returned to racing the following year.   The Tattersalls Gold Cup won his owner €155,000.

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The first day of Royal Ascot 2015 - a broadcaster's eye view of the horses...and a hat

The morning view from Sasha's 'office' - right above the finish The morning view from Sasha's 'office' - right above the finish Sasha Thorbek-Hooper takes time off from her day-job at Greatwood to broadcast from Royal Ascot for BBC Radio Berkshire:

As day one of Royal Ascot 2015 draws to a close, we realise sadly that the Sole Power dream has come to an end.  A third consecutive win in the Group 1 King's Stand Stakes was dashed by the 20-1 outsider Goldream trained in Newmarket by Robert Cowell and partnered to success by the ecstatic Martin Harley - the jockey's first ever Royal Ascot win.

No so subtle - but from the look of the lady on her right she might be wearing trainersNo so subtle - but from the look of the lady on her right she might be wearing trainersFrankie's 50th Ascot winner is within a hair's breadth, but we will have to wait until tomorrow to see if he is able to treat his adoring and waiting public with another of his legendary 'Frankie Flying Dismounts'.

The stand out horse of the day was the magnificent Gleneagles - adding the Group 1 feature race St James's Palace Stakes to his already impressive booty - including the Irish and English 2000 Guineas.

BBC Radio Berkshire Sports Editor Tim Dellor gets a word with Damian LewisBBC Radio Berkshire Sports Editor Tim Dellor gets a word with Damian LewisAs expected a plethora of celebrities swept through the gates including Ant & Dec and 'A Lister' Damian Lewis.

But as ever it was the Queen who stole the show looking stunning in a fuchsia dress coat over a white and floral dress.

The weather looks set fair for the rest of the week and we will be hoping for some Wiltshire success - the Hannon/Hughes combo are pretty buoyant about their runner tomorrow: Ivawood running in the opener - The Jersey Stakes - against the Queen's Ring of Truth.

My best tip for the day is to swap the heels for flats!

Don't look now Dec, but there's lady behind you in flats!Don't look now Dec, but there's lady behind you in flats!

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